Category Archives: Reptiles

When you spend time away from civilzation, you tend to see plenty of reptiles: lizards, turtles, snakes, etc. Some of them can be quite colorful, others are just fun to watch.

The Death of Planet Earth

NASA 'Epic' Earth image

NASA Captures “EPIC” Earth Image

Has mankind really driven the planet to the edge of a catastrophic crash of life? Is greed blinding us to what is right in front of our faces? Some would say maybe these claims are a little too reactionary.  Okay, so a bit of Florida gets wet, and maybe some people will have to move inland. Can’t science just come up with new technologies to solve the dilemmas we face? Does industry just need to develop a practical and economical electric car? What would happen if we just did “business as usual”? The claims of doom are a bit extreme and, if we accept them at face value, they are really inconvenient to living our lives. What is science telling us about what is happening right now, what we face in the very near future, and what can be done to avoid it?

Earth really is exceptional. From our naturalist point of view, this planet’s life is unimaginably beautiful and breath-takingly diverse. But it doesn’t take a genius to see that Earth’s abundance and diversity is disappearing. There is a point at which this decline becomes mass extinction, and that point is much closer than you may think. Our own survival is indeed inextricably tied to the health of our world. If we expect science to save us, then we need to listen to what science is telling us. A brief yet preliminary look at our origins will help. First let’s cover some basics. Continue reading

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Garter Snake vs. Vole

garter snake vs vole

A Mountain Garter Snake captures a California Vole.

We’ve written before about the featherless joys of birding (Desert Bighorn SheepWestern Zebra-tailed Lizard) – those occasions when being out birding puts us in the right place to see other animals doing what they do. So on a recent Sea & Sage Audubon trip to the eastern Sierra Nevada, we were treated to the spectacle of a garter snake that had just captured a vole.

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Palm Springs Aerial Tram

Aerial Tram View Down

View down Chino Canyon from aerial tram

During a recent visit from family, we took the famous Palm Springs Aerial Tram up to Mountain Station (see photo of Mountain Station here), the entrance to Mt. San Jacinto State Park. The ride is quite dramatic, rising almost 6000 feet from a dry desert Chino Canyon bottom to an elevation of 8516 feet at Mountain Station, in less than 15 minutes. The Swiss-made aerial tram cars have a rotating floor so that passengers get the full panorama during their climb without jostling for position. Once you arrive at Mountain Station, you have a choice of activities. You can visit the gift shop, catch a snack or a meal at the Peaks Restaurant, or exit into Long Valley and take some of the hiking trails in the state park. We ended up doing all three of those. Continue reading

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Birdless Joys of Birding – Part 2

Birdless joys of birding occur when a birding trip turns up other cool animals. Another birding trip to the East Mojave Preserve produced an opportunity for photographing interesting non-avian critters. At the Baker Sewer Ponds, we encountered this male Western Zebra-tailed Lizard – females lack the black bands on the belly.

Western Zebra-tailed Lizard

The Western Zebra-tailed Lizard is a denizen of the Mojave and Colorado Deserts and the Great Basin. It is diurnal and forages for insects and smaller lizards except during extreme heat. When not taking refuge in the shade, it maintains only minimal contact with the ground. As seen in this photo, only the vent and heels are touching the sand. Zebra-taileds will occasionally take this a step farther and stand on only two feet at a time.

When they are scurrying around (with top speeds over 25 mph), Western Zebra-tailed Lizards have their tails curled up over their backs like a scorpion and sometimes use only their hind feet. They usually don’t allow close approach. This photo was taken from a distance of about 40′ with a point and shoot camera through a Kowa TSN-884 spotting scope with their new TE-11WZ 25-60x wide angle zoom eyepiece. The zoom features two elements of Extra-low Dispersion (ED) glass, an innovation in Kowa eyepieces which improves contrast and sharpness by further reducing chromatic aberration.

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