Deep Creek Dragonflies

Gray Sanddragon lifting off

Gray Sanddragon lifting off

When summer hits and the doldrums set in for a few weeks after the migrants have left to breed up north, many of us turn to chasing butterflies and odonata (dragonflies and damselflies, or “odes”). Odes are particularly fun because they make such great photography subjects with their wild colors, spiky appendages and weird shapes. Even the names are awesome! The only bird names that can even compete are mostly hummingbirds… Anyway, recent reports of some first county record dragonflies in San Bernardino County took us up to Deep Creek, a unit in the San Bernardino National Forest, administered to by the United States Forest Service. Tom Benson recently discovered a population of Bison Snaketails and Western River Cruisers on this beautiful and relatively pristine creek near Lake Arrowhead in the San Bernardino Mountains. The previous southern-most records for Bison Snaketail were from Tulare County, so this find significantly extends the known range of that species. Likewise, the southern-most known range of Western River Cruiser was up in Kern and Inyo counties. These two species belong to the clubtail family, which, with their oddly bulging tail segments and brilliant colors, includes some of the most colorful, large dragonflies in California. Continue reading

Owls in the Everglades

Eastern Screech-Owl in the Everglades

Eastern Screech-Owl is about the same size as an European Starling (same length and 2/3 the weight)

Southern Florida and the Everglades is home to five different species of owls. On a very quick trip to Southern Florida and the upper Keys we went in search of the owls in the Everglades. Of the twenty species of owls found in North America the Eastern Screech-Owl is the only species that is exclusively found east of the Rockies and would be primary in our searches. Barred Owl, rare in the west, would be our second target. With a new upcoming release of our sister Owling.com website, Optics4Birding sent me off to the east coast to document the owls in the Everglades. It’s a tough job but someone has to do it! Continue reading

Winter Birds of Calgary Canada

Gray Partridge

♫ and a partridge in a pear tree ♪ … oops no pear trees.

I took a very brief trip (5 days) to see the winter birds of Calgary Canada at the end of January and beginning of February. My primary reason for traveling to this area was to look for Snowy and Hawk Owls since these two owls are not overly common in the continental U.S. even though small numbers usually show up most years in the northern states. Hawk Owl would be the most uncommon of these two species and the one I had most wanted to find. Along with the owls, the mammals and winter birding this far north promised to offer other species that I would not find in Southern California and some that may not be very common in the lower 48 states at all. New to me, I was pleased to run into several coveys of Grey Partridges while in the area. They are fairly common this far north but I had never seen one. Since I have been singing 🎼 “and a partridge in a pear tree” ♫ every Christmas since I was a kid it was a pleasure to actually have a picture in my mind of how they really act and what they look like. They seemed quite similar to our quail being in groups running around on the ground (missed any in pear trees!). I was fortunate enough to have had the opportunity bring a pair of Zeiss Victory SF 10×42 Binoculars with me for review. For now all I will say is “WOW, The views through these binoculars are incredible”.

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Kowa TSN-EX16 Extender Review

Kowa TSN-EX16 Extender exploded

Kowa TSN-EX16 Extender (exploded view)

Kowa TSN-EX16 Extender

Kowa America recently released the Kowa TSN-EX16 Extender. The extender is placed between the body of a Kowa TSN-880 or TSN-770 spotting scope body and the eyepiece and multiplies the standard magnification by 1.6x. This is analogous to photographic lens extenders that mount between a camera’s lens and body. With the current 25-60x zoom eyepiece (Kowa TE-11WZ) that fits these spotting scopes, the resultant magnification becomes 40-96x!

But what about the historical downsides of extenders? How does the optical quality hold up? Is there much loss of light? What about sharpness and clarity? I took out my trusty TSN-884 and Panasonic Lumix G6 to find out. An accommodating Peregrine Falcon stayed long enough for me to get some test shots. Continue reading

Filigree Skimmer 3rd record in CA

Skimmer-Filigree-2015-08-30-042

Filigree Skimmer face on

When the dog days of summer become the birding doldrums, some birders turn to other flying creatures. The most accessible of these are butterflies, dragonflies, and damselflies, all of which require binoculars with excellent close focus. It was unusual recently that a birder birding San Timoteo Creek in Redlands, Riverside County, CA discovered a pair of Filigree Skimmer dragonflies (Pseudoleon superbus). As the species has only recorded twice before in California, we went to take a look. Continue reading

Flammulated Owl in the Northern Sierras

Adult Flammulated Owl in the Sierra Nevada Mountains

An adult Flammulated Owl near Lake Davis in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of Northern California.

Flammulated Owl is a spring and summer resident throughout the California Sierra Nevada Mountains. It is the second smallest owl in North America, and smallest of the eared owls. Only the Elf Owl is smaller. It is also the most migratory owl in North America, completely leaving the US every year for its winter haunts in Southern Mexico and Guatemala.

The Flammulated Owl is just slightly larger in size than a House Sparrow and often 30 to 40 feet high in thick pines. Being dark brown in color and having a very ventriloquial call it is difficult to locate. The strictly nocturnal Flammulated Owl can be extremely difficult to get good looks at in the darkness of night. This is further complicated by the fact that he is mostly completely mute outside of about a month between mid-May and mid-June during its breeding season (which is not now). Continue reading

Garter Snake vs. Vole

garter snake vs vole

A Mountain Garter Snake captures a California Vole.

We’ve written before about the featherless joys of birding (Desert Bighorn SheepWestern Zebra-tailed Lizard) – those occasions when being out birding puts us in the right place to see other animals doing what they do. So on a recent Sea & Sage Audubon trip to the eastern Sierra Nevada, we were treated to the spectacle of a garter snake that had just captured a vole.

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Gray Thrasher: 1st US Record

Gray Thrasher at Famosa Slough August 2, 2015

Gray Thrasher at Famosa Slough August 2, 2015

Gray Thrasher is a non-migratory endemic to Baja California, so when Sunday afternoon on August 2, 2015 was interrupted with a report of the first US occurrence in San Diego, we had to make the 75 mile drive and take a look.

Finding the Gray Thrasher

The Gray Thrasher was found by John Bruin, Lisa Ruby, and Terry Hurst at the southwest end of Famosa Slough. This is an area that has had its share of rarities, including Bar-tailed Godwit. Once we arrived and parked, we quickly found a couple of dozen birders standing around or off to other parts of the area looking for the bird. We learned where it had been seen (about 45 minutes before our arrival) and which way it went. Since it obviously wasn’t where everyone was standing, we decided to look around. Just after our fourth pass by a large lemonade berry bush, someone spotted the Gray Thrasher deep in the foliage. Birders surrounded the bush looking for a better angle. All of a sudden, the thrasher decided it was hungry and came out onto the slope to forage in the leaves and twigs only about 15 feet away from us. That was too close for my Kowa TSN-884, but just right for binoculars.
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4th of July 2015 Fireworks

Happy 4th of July 2015

This year we stayed close to home to watch the 4th of July 2015 fireworks. Walking to the top of the hill that is next to our local high school we were able to see several fireworks displays from one place. The beauty of our local 2015 firework shows were quite impressive and certainly worth an attempt at taking nice photos of. Since I had tried taking photos of the fireworks last year I figured my 2015 firework photos might be a bit better. As it turns out they are! Hope you enjoy the pictures and that this year will continue to bring many outdoor viewing opportunities. A good pair of binoculars and or spotting scope from Optics4Birding makes the viewing experiences of life more enjoyable. Happy 4th of July to you from all  the Optics4Birding staff.

4th of July 2015 fireworks in Southern California

2015 fireworks in Southern California (click image to enlarge)

Puerto Rican Birds

Puerto Rican Tody - Puerto Rican Birds

Puerto Rican Todies are fairly common in the rainforests. We saw these in both El Yunque and Bosque Estatal De Río Abajo.

Mid-April we took a trip to Puerto Rico to see the Puerto Rican birds and wildlife. As would be expected, the weather was warm and humid. Luckily we did not run into any rain at all, which made for a very productive nature watching adventure. The birdlife was abundant. The coastline and rainforests were absolutely beautiful. There are 18 endemic species of Puerto Rican birds and 30 endemic reptiles and amphibians. Our main interest was the birds but we did run across a few of the other endemics too. I am sorry to say that there are also 13 wildlife species that have gone extinct. One of these was a Puerto Rican Barn Owl that I would have really liked to have seen. Several species that are there now are threatened and currently in jeopardy. Continue reading